Chattanooga Transportation

Chattanooga Transportation

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ChattanoogaMetropolitanAirport

Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport

GroomeTransportation

Groome Transportation

ChattanoogaTechCenterForLogistics

Chattanooga: The Tech Center for Logistics?

Getting Around the Scenic City

No matter how you prefer to travel, Chattanooga continues to offer a wide variety of transportation options to its residents and visitors with eco-friendliness and sustainability at the core. A bustling transportation center ever since the mid-1800s, the city thrives off its proximity to the Tennessee River and direct access to top rail systems and interstate highways.

Chattanooga’s first rail line was ushered in as the arrival of the Western and Atlantic Railroad made history in 1850. Eight years later, Chattanooga welcomed the East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia Railroad and quickly became a hub for trains. Over 150 years later, the city is still a hub for railroads, which continue to be an essential part of the economy. Freight is transported through Chattanooga every day on trains owned by CSX and Norfolk Southern, among others.

One of the deepest-rooted means of transport in the city is the Tennessee River. The river carries barges filled with goods up to the Missouri and Ohio Rivers and south to the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, which stretches to the Gulf of Mexico. More than 25,000 barges make their way along the river every year, carrying 40-50 million tons of goods to be distributed. By using the river, consumers save nearly $500 million in transportation costs.

Chattanooga sits conveniently at the convergence of three major interstates – I-24, I-59, and I-75. With its prime location, several leading truck companies, such as U.S. Xpress and Covenant Transport, have called Chattanooga home for decades, and many more have begun to see the potential that this location holds. Third-party logistics providers, such as UPS-owned Coyote Logistics and Kenco Group, have also made the Scenic City a part of their routes, and Chattanooga-based freight-tech startup FreightWaves has gained notoriety since its founding in 2016. This ever-growing cluster of trucking and logistics companies has earned the Chattanooga area the moniker “freight alley” in recent years.

Despite recent economic factors, the Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport has seen growth and development over the last year and even proposed a multi-decade development plan in 2019. The proposal, which focuses on the Lee Highway, Jubilee Drive, and Lovell Field areas, features everything from hotels and housing to office and industrial space. More recently, the airport broke ground on a new parking garage, projected to open July 2021 , that will hold 1,300 cars, and it also has plans to expand the number of terminals.

Having served the Chattanooga area for more than 40 years, the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) is continuing to provide a cost-effective, efficient, and safe multimodal public transit system. With a typical ridership of over 3 million passengers annually along 20 routes, CARTA provides many options for residents and visitors to get around the city, including Care-a-van services for the disabled. CARTA also runs the Lookout Mountain Incline Railway and has consulted with national and international governments committed to electric bus technology.

For the two-wheeled drivers, Bike Chattanooga maintains approximately 400 rental bikes that can be picked up from one of 42 stations located throughout the city. The availability of bicycles is accompanied by extensive bike lanes, which are only getting more popular, allowing for a smooth and safe ride to work or for recreation.

Chattanooga’s commitment to sustainability has led to a surge in electric car ownership over the last few years. To keep up with high demand, the city has installed more than 100 public charging stations within a nine-mile radius of the city. But the sustainability offerings don’t stop there. Additional green initiatives, such as GreenTrips, which features an online carpool matching program, are helping to reduce the city’s carbon footprint.

Did you know?

Chattanooga introduced its first public transportation system in September of 1875 with the arrival of horse-drawn trolley cars. The trolley cars took residents along Market Street, running from the riverfront to present-day Martin Luther King Boulevard.

Offering easy access to numerous major cities in the South, Chattanooga’s interstates have been a mainstay for residents and visitors alike. Interstates 24, 75, and 59 get travelers to places such as Atlanta, Birmingham, Nashville, and Knoxville in just two hours. Other major cities like Louisville, Charlotte, Cincinnati, and Memphis are roughly five hours away and provide even more options for a weekend escape.

Taking advantage of a prime location in the heart of the South, several trucking companies call Chattanooga home. Small carriers work in and around the city, while U.S. Xpress and Covenant Transport, two of the top trucking companies in the country, manage their operations from the Scenic City. Both provide long-distance trucking, distributing raw materials, and finished goods to other businesses across the nation.

The Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (CHA) continues to see unparalleled growth and offers nonstop flights to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, New York City, Orlando, Tampa, and Washington D.C. Boasting the convenience of a smaller airport but with excellent amenities, CHA features flights from major airlines Allegiant, American Airlines, Delta, and United. Airport amenities consist of restaurants, Wi-Fi, and notary services, just to name a few, and CHA was also the nation’s first 100% solar-powered airport.

From business to vacation needs, the fixed-base Wilson Air Center offers private air service for those in the Scenic City. Accommodations can be made for private parties, and the center also features airline and freight handling services.

Megabus offers intercity bus service to locations such as Atlanta, Louisville, Nashville, Chicago, and Indianapolis. Popular for its amenities, including power outlets, restrooms, and free Wi-Fi, Megabus offers affordable fares on its famous double-decker buses. Their permanent stop is located on East 23rd Street.

The Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) has provided Chattanooga with public transportation for decades. With 20 fixed bus routes visiting various points throughout the city, a free electric shuttle system running downtown, and a Care-a-van for the disabled, CARTA is a great way to get around, not to mention it has one of the largest fleets of electric buses in the country. Fares start at 75 cents per ride, and 24-hour, 7-day, and 31-day ride passes are also available. CARTA buses are equipped with free Wi-Fi for the community.

Operated by the Chattanooga Department of Transportation, Bike Chattanooga allows for approximately 400 bikes throughout the city to be found across 42 rental stations. Thanks to locations spanning from Coolidge Park to the Lookout Mountain Incline Railway, biking has become a popular way to travel for residents and visitors. Riders have the option to purchase an annual membership for just $50, and 3-day and 24-hour passes are also available.

Nestled within a nine-mile radius of Chattanooga, there are more than 100 electric vehicle charging stations located for one’s convenience. These stations reach areas like Ooltewah, Hixson, East Brainerd, and Lookout Mountain, making it easy for residents to be environmentally friendly. Major Chattanooga hubs, such as the Hamilton Place Mall and many attractions located downtown, all feature stations.

Located in East Ridge, Groome Transportation provides affordable and reliable shuttle service to the Nashville International Airport and Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. Groome provides plenty of amenities, like 24-hour reservations, a free parking and waiting area, group rates, and pet transportation.

Keeping with its history, railroading continues to be a cornerstone of Chattanooga’s economy. Major railroads CSX and Norfolk Southern connect Chattanooga to various other major cities all over the nation. CSX operates and maintains approximately 1,600 miles of track across Tennessee, while Norfolk Southern’s Crescent Corridor is a $2.5 billion rail infrastructure system that spans 11 states.

With proximity to I-24, I-75, and I-59, Chattanooga is a prime location for logistics providers. Some of the top providers in the area include Covenant Transport, Kenco Group, Coyote Logistics, and U.S. Xpress. Trident Transport and LYNC Logistics continue to gain steam, having both been honored on Inc. magazine’s 5,000 list of fastest-growing companies in 2019 and 2020, while Dynamo and FreightWaves, a logistics accelerator and a logistics data provider, respectively, are constantly innovating and impacting the industry.

Allowing access to numerous inland rivers and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, the Tennessee River is a haven for transporting goods and services all throughout the country. Two public terminals that reside in Chattanooga include Centre South Riverport/Industrial Park and the Port of Chattanooga. Companies such as Serodino, Inc. move over 2 million tons of cargo each year on the winding Tennessee River.

Getting Around the Scenic City

No matter how you prefer to travel, Chattanooga continues to offer a wide variety of transportation options to its residents and visitors with eco-friendliness and sustainability at the core. A bustling transportation center ever since the mid-1800s, the city thrives off its proximity to the Tennessee River and direct access to top rail systems and interstate highways.

Chattanooga’s first rail line was ushered in as the arrival of the Western and Atlantic Railroad made history in 1850. Eight years later, Chattanooga welcomed the East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia Railroad and quickly became a hub for trains. Over 150 years later, the city is still a hub for railroads, which continue to be an essential part of the economy. Freight is transported through Chattanooga every day on trains owned by CSX and Norfolk Southern, among others.

One of the deepest-rooted means of transport in the city is the Tennessee River. The river carries barges filled with goods up to the Missouri and Ohio Rivers and south to the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, which stretches to the Gulf of Mexico. More than 25,000 barges make their way along the river every year, carrying 40-50 million tons of goods to be distributed. By using the river, consumers save nearly $500 million in transportation costs.

Chattanooga sits conveniently at the convergence of three major interstates – I-24, I-59, and I-75. With its prime location, several leading truck companies, such as U.S. Xpress and Covenant Transport, have called Chattanooga home for decades, and many more have begun to see the potential that this location holds. Third-party logistics providers, such as UPS-owned Coyote Logistics and Kenco Group, have also made the Scenic City their home, and Chattanooga-based freight-tech startup FreightWaves has gained acclaim since its founding in 2016. This ever-growing cluster of trucking and logistics companies has earned the Chattanooga area the moniker “freight alley” in recent years.

Despite recent economic factors driven by COVID-19, the Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport has continued new development initiatives. Plans for a multi-decade development project were announced in 2019, and the proposal, which focuses on the Lee Highway, Jubilee Drive, and Lovell Field areas, features everything from hotels and housing to office and industrial space. In 2020, the airport broke ground on a new parking garage, projected to open July 2021, that will hold 1,300 cars, and it also has plans to expand the number of terminals. 

Having served the Chattanooga area for more than 40 years, the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) is continuing to provide a cost-effective, efficient, and safe multimodal public transit system. With a typical ridership of over 3 million passengers annually along 20 routes, CARTA provides many options for residents and visitors to get around the city, including Care-a-van services for the disabled. CARTA also runs the Lookout Mountain Incline Railway and has consulted with national and international governments committed to electric bus technology.

For the two-wheeled drivers, Bike Chattanooga maintains approximately 400 rental bikes that can be picked up from one of 42 stations located throughout the city. The availability of bicycles is accompanied by extensive bike lanes, which are only getting more popular, allowing for a smooth and safe ride to work or for recreation.

Chattanooga’s commitment to sustainability has led to a surge in electric car ownership over the last few years. To keep up with high demand, the city has installed more than 100 public charging stations within a nine-mile radius of the city. But the sustainability offerings don’t stop there. Additional green initiatives, such as GreenTrips, which features an online carpool matching program, are helping to reduce the city’s carbon footprint.

Did you know?

Chattanooga introduced its first public transportation system in September of 1875 with the arrival of horse-drawn trolley cars. The trolley cars took residents along Market Street, running from the riverfront to present-day Martin Luther King Boulevard.

Offering easy access to numerous major cities in the South, Chattanooga’s interstates have been a mainstay for residents and visitors alike. Interstates 24, 75, and 59 get travelers to places such as Atlanta, Birmingham, Nashville, and Knoxville in just two hours. Other major cities like Louisville, Charlotte, Cincinnati, and Memphis are roughly five hours away and provide even more options for a weekend escape.

Taking advantage of a prime location in the heart of the South, several trucking companies call Chattanooga home. Small carriers work in and around the city, while U.S. Xpress and Covenant Transport, two of the top trucking companies in the country, manage their operations from the Scenic City. Both provide long-distance trucking, distributing raw materials, and finished goods to other businesses across the nation.

The Chattanooga Metropolitan Airport (CHA) continues to see unparalleled growth and offers nonstop flights to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, New York City, Orlando, Tampa, and Washington D.C. Boasting the convenience of a smaller airport but with excellent amenities, CHA features flights from major airlines Allegiant, American Airlines, Delta, and United. Airport amenities consist of restaurants, Wi-Fi, and notary services, just to name a few, and CHA was also the nation’s first 100% solar-powered airport.

From business to vacation needs, the fixed-base Wilson Air Center offers private air service for those in the Scenic City. Accommodations can be made for private parties, and the center also features airline and freight handling services.

Megabus offers intercity bus service to locations such as Atlanta, Louisville, Nashville, Chicago, and Indianapolis. Popular for its amenities, including power outlets, restrooms, and free Wi-Fi, Megabus offers affordable fares on its famous double-decker buses. Their permanent stop is located on East 23rd Street.

The Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA) has provided Chattanooga with public transportation for decades. With 20 fixed bus routes visiting various points throughout the city, a free electric shuttle system running downtown, and a Care-a-van for the disabled, CARTA is a great way to get around, not to mention it has one of the largest fleets of electric buses in the country. Fares start at 75 cents per ride, and 24-hour, 7-day, and 31-day ride passes are also available. CARTA buses are equipped with free Wi-Fi for the community.

Operated by the Chattanooga Department of Transportation, Bike Chattanooga allows for approximately 400 bikes throughout the city to be found across 42 rental stations. Thanks to locations spanning from Coolidge Park to the Lookout Mountain Incline Railway, biking has become a popular way to travel for residents and visitors. Riders have the option to purchase an annual membership for just $50, and 3-day and 24-hour passes are also available.

Nestled within a nine-mile radius of Chattanooga, there are more than 100 electric vehicle charging stations located for one’s convenience. These stations reach areas like Ooltewah, Hixson, East Brainerd, and Lookout Mountain, making it easy for residents to be environmentally friendly. Major Chattanooga hubs, such as the Hamilton Place Mall and many attractions located downtown, all feature stations.

Located in East Ridge, Groome Transportation provides affordable and reliable shuttle service to the Nashville International Airport and Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. Groome provides plenty of amenities, like 24-hour reservations, a free parking and waiting area, group rates, and pet transportation.

Keeping with its history, railroading continues to be a cornerstone of Chattanooga’s economy. Major railroads CSX and Norfolk Southern connect Chattanooga to various other major cities all over the nation. CSX operates and maintains approximately 1,600 miles of track across Tennessee, while Norfolk Southern’s Crescent Corridor is a $2.5 billion rail infrastructure system that spans 11 states.

With proximity to I-24, I-75, and I-59, Chattanooga is a prime location for logistics providers. Some of the top providers in the area include Covenant Transport, Kenco Group, Coyote Logistics, and U.S. Xpress. Trident Transport and LYNC Logistics continue to gain steam, having both been honored on Inc. magazine’s 5,000 list of fastest-growing companies in 2019 and 2020, while Dynamo and FreightWaves, a logistics accelerator and a logistics data provider, respectively, are constantly innovating and impacting the industry.

Allowing access to numerous inland rivers and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, the Tennessee River is a haven for transporting goods and services all throughout the country. Two public terminals that reside in Chattanooga include Centre South Riverport/Industrial Park and the Port of Chattanooga. Companies such as Serodino, Inc. move over 2 million tons of cargo each year on the winding Tennessee River.

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